KRACK Puts The Security of Wi-Fi Networks at Risk WPA2

KRACK Puts The Security of Wi-Fi Networks at Risk WPA2
KRACK Puts The Security of Wi-Fi Networks at Risk WPA2

Protecting our signal Wifi has become a priority for many users, not only because we want to share our connection with anyone, but also prevent them from accessing the data we have stored on our computer. WPA2 security, with its different variants, has become one of the most used, leaving behind the WEP connections that did not offer the same encryption and security as the WP2 and which were also susceptible to attacks to decrypt the password. But according to a security expert, WPA2 networks have a vulnerability that allows access to devices that are not protected against it that are absolutely all available in the market.

This vulnerability affects smartphones, smart TVs, routers, modems, Blu-Ray devices any device that connects to the Internet and uses the security protocol WP2, a protocol that had demonstrated a virtually impenetrable security. The problem now is that to solve this vulnerability, and it is necessary for the manufacturer to release an update to address, an update has already begun to send some companies like Apple or Microsoft, protecting from this vulnerability all the devices that run their OS.

KRACK is a small application that gets into the communication between the devices when they try to link and can thus decrypt the password used. With the following example, you may see it more clearly. When we get to our house, our smartphone searches for the known Wi-Fi network to connect, in the process this application can sneak into the communication of the same and access the data stored in our device. But if only one of the devices is up to date and protected against that vulnerability, the process becomes impossible again as it has so far.
Most likely, our router will never receive a security update from the manufacturer, so at least we must make sure that our device, whether smartphone, tablet, computer if it is so that this way all information in our devices remains protected as long as this vulnerability has been detected.
According to Apple, this vulnerability was solved in the last betas it launched from iOS 11. However, Android users again are again hit hardest, especially all those whose version is Marshmallow or higher. Google claims that it has already put to work to launch a security patch, but as is usual in the Android ecosystem is very unlikely to reach all devices, as few are manufacturers who bother to release patches security for older devices.